The Center for Instructional Technology’s Flipped Classroom Fellowship kicked off on October 11th with twelve faculty from a wide range of disciplines, from Chemistry and Physics to Public Policy, Literature and Romance Studies.  The Fellowship will continue through the end of this academic year.

So far, the Fellows have participated in several activities, including writing and sharing learning objectives for their course, exploring ideas on how to provide students with learning materials before class, class activities that can support goals for their course, and getting feedback on student learning. A flipped class is more than just guided discussion or problem-solving sessions for the students – the Fellows are learning about structured activities that allow students to apply what they learn in class sessions.

Some examples of the flipped classroom structured activities we have looked at so far include:

think-pair-share – students in pairs consider a problem first individually, then as a pair, and then share their ideas with the class,

  • minute paper – students are given a prompt (what is the main point of X? what do you need more information about?, etc) to reflect and write about for  a brief period,
  • unfolding case study – students in small groups are given a case study that offers points for discussion and decisions, and then continues with new information for additional decisions,
  • gallery walk – students in groups post responses to an issue or problem around the room, then critique the work of other groups as they walk from one post to another; at the final post, each group reports on the work in front of them,
  • jigsaw – students learn in “expert groups” and then return to “home groups” to share their knowledge.

In addition to sharing ideas on activities, the Fellows are participating in Teaching Squares, observing each other’s classes as a means of self-reflection on their own teaching.

Updates from the Fellows will be posted to the CIT blog as the Fellowship progresses through April 2014.

If you are interested in flipping your classroom or using flipped classroom techniques, contact the CIT to speak with a consultant.

 

Randy Riddle

Randy A. Riddle consults with faculty in the Humanities and Social Sciences on integrating technology into teaching. He has been a CIT consultant since 2000. His professional interests include e-learning, social networking, online productivity tools, video and multimedia, and visualization. Randy's current work includes management of the CIT's Faculty Fellows program, consulting on Coursera course design and exploring areas such as e-textbook authoring. His other interests outside of work include restoration of vintage recording formats and broadcasting and film history. He volunteers for the Old Time Radio Researchers Group and maintains an ongoing blog on radio history research.

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One Response to Checking in on the Flipped Classroom Fellows

  1. Keith Rocci says:

    Thanks for the update! Enjoyed the tips.